Tag Archives: patentability

Will the New USPTO Director’s Practical Thinking Translate to a More Flexible Approach and Better Decisions?

By Stephen Hall

Once-in-a-generation patent reform was introduced in our country about five years ago.  Similar to many major initiatives, it may have reaped a few unintended consequences as well.  Andrei Iancu, current nominee for USPTO Director, has written about one of these consequences that affects certain procedures at the Patent Office.  Among his many other writings, he also has written substantively concerning the patentability of software.  This post examines Mr. Iancu’s writings on both topics, and offers some thoughts on how his thinking could affect future patent cases.

THE SUBSTANTIVE: WHEN SHOULD SOFTWARE BE PATENTABLE?

There is not and never has been a bright line rule on the patentability of software-based systems.  Rather, patentability depends on the nature of the problem the system solves and the extent of the improvements over existing technology present in the solution.

Although most cases addressing the software issue begin by citing the 2014 Alice[1] case by the Supreme Court, Mr. Iancu was Continue reading Will the New USPTO Director’s Practical Thinking Translate to a More Flexible Approach and Better Decisions?