Category Archives: Uncategorized

Blocked: Knight Institute Fractures Trump’s Twitter Shield

By Meghan Cox; Jake Smith, Wyatt Summer Associate 2018

 Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University v. Trump

Most Americans would agree that Donald Trump has no greater platform than Twitter. The self-proclaimed “Ernest Hemingway of 140 characters” understands that he can maximize his influence through the @realDonaldTrump account because tweeting provides the most direct interaction with constituents.  But unlike Hemingway, who is renowned for his “iceberg theory” of writing—in which a story’s deeper meaning is veiled under simple innuendos and symbolism—President Trump leaves little to a reader’s imagination.  His direct, and often abrasive, rhetoric has led many readers to reply in disagreement, and, in turn, Trump has developed a propensity for blocking these readers on Twitter.  Now that Trump is blocking people in his capacity as President, his so-called “haters and losers” may have recourse under the Constitution. Continue reading

PYRAT Rum and PIRATE PISS Beer Not Confusable, According to TTAB

By Julie Laemmle; Alicia Humphrey, Wyatt Summer Associate 2018alcohol-bar-black-background-602750

In a recently released ruling, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (“Board”) dismissed PYRAT RUM’s opposition to registration of PIRATE PISS for beer, ale and lager.  Patrón Spirits International AG v. Conyngham Brewing Company, Opposition No. 91226939 (June 8, 2018).  The Board, in an opinion authored by Administrative Trademark Judge Thomas W. Wellington, held that PIRATE PISS for beer is not likely to be confused with the already-registered mark PYRAT for rum.  By rejecting PYRAT RUM’s challenge, the Board is allowing Conyngham Brewing Company’s application for registration to proceed.

In dismissing the Opposition, the Board took into account a variety of considerations commonly referred to as the “du Pont factors.”  The opinion, organized according to the du Pont factors, found the following: Continue reading

Net Neutrality Repeal is Anti-Consumer but the Problem is Even Bigger

This article was originally published on Commercial Appeal, part of the USA Today Network, as an opinion piece written by Mark Vorder-BrueggeClick here to view the original publication.

net neutrality

The Federal Communications Commission has now repealed its own 2015 “Net Neutrality” regulations. As controversial as this has been, it is just a small part of the federal government’s massive policy failure concerning the Internet.

Media reports over the past 15 years have detailed extensive horror stories of monopolistic service options, consumer price-gouging, frequent outages, and downright hostile support personnel.

A truly legitimate policy would be something like this: “High-speed, high-quality Internet access available to everyone at competitive prices, with minimal service disruptions and effective, user-friendly provider support.”

No version of the FCC regulations or any other agency initiatives, or Congress, or any president, has ever adopted a comprehensive policy of this type.

Continue reading

Is Inter Partes Review Unconstitutional?

By Stephen Hall

iStock_000019576650Large“Adjudication:”  a proceeding which leads to a judicial decision

On November 27, 2017, the Supreme Court heard arguments concerning a challenge to the most frequent form of patent challenges before the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”), known as inter partes review (“IPR”).  The USPTO is a federal agency empowered by Congress to grant patents and perform other functions related to patents.  Its other functions include the authority to review previously granted patents and determine whether they were, in fact, validly granted.

In some cases, the need for review may occur because material not found by the patent examiner would have prevented the patent from being granted in the first place.  With all the millions of patents, published applications and journal articles in this country and worldwide, as well as other written publications, industry standards and activities that could affect the right to a patent, there is no system of patent searching guaranteed to uncover every relevant item.  Thus, for several decades, Congress has authorized Continue reading

Will the New USPTO Director’s Practical Thinking Translate to a More Flexible Approach and Better Decisions?

By Stephen Hall

Once-in-a-generation patent reform was introduced in our country about five years ago.  Similar to many major initiatives, it may have reaped a few unintended consequences as well.  Andrei Iancu, current nominee for USPTO Director, has written about one of these consequences that affects certain procedures at the Patent Office.  Among his many other writings, he also has written substantively concerning the patentability of software.  This post examines Mr. Iancu’s writings on both topics, and offers some thoughts on how his thinking could affect future patent cases.

THE SUBSTANTIVE: WHEN SHOULD SOFTWARE BE PATENTABLE?

There is not and never has been a bright line rule on the patentability of software-based systems.  Rather, patentability depends on the nature of the problem the system solves and the extent of the improvements over existing technology present in the solution.

Although most cases addressing the software issue begin by citing the 2014 Alice[1] case by the Supreme Court, Mr. Iancu was Continue reading

Mark Vorder-Bruegge Admitted to American College of Trial Lawyers

Mark Vorder-BrueggeMark Vorder-Bruegge, Jr. has become a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in North America.

The induction ceremony at which Mr. Vorder-Bruegge became a Fellow took place recently before an audience of approximately 600 persons during the recent 2017 Spring Meeting of the College in Boca Raton, Florida.

Founded in 1950, the College is composed of the best of the trial bar from the United States and Canada. Fellowship in the College is extended by invitation only and only after careful investigation, to those experienced trial lawyers of diverse backgrounds, who have mastered the art of advocacy and whose professional careers have been marked by the highest standards of ethical conduct, professionalism, civility and collegiality. Lawyers must have a minimum of fifteen years trial experience before they can be considered for Fellowship.

Continue reading

Matt Lubozynski authors article for the Memphis Daily News on recent patent-infringement lawsuit ruling

MattLubozynski_HeadshotMatt Lubozynski, member of Wyatt’s Intellectual Property Protection & Litigation Service Team, wrote an article that was recently published in the Memphis Daily News.  The article, “Patent-holders Feel More Secure Thanks to Patent-Infringement Lawsuit Ruling,” discusses how the Supreme Court’s decision in Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc. has helped ease the rigid standards required to collect enhanced damages against a patent infringer.

Please click here to read the full article.

%d bloggers like this: